From the Dead…

I promise this is not another blog about why I’ve been gone so long, because in fact it’s been about two weeks. I also promise I am not preparing our company to publish the material required to survive the Zombie Apocalypse, nor are we starting to publish books targeting a zombie audience in preparation for the upcoming event. Finally, this is not a blog to announce that, in fact, the Zombie Apocalypse has already occurred and resulted in the creation of “Tools of the Publishing Elite.”

This is a blog about a letter from an attorney.

I pick up the mail about three times a week from Divertir Publishing’s P.O. box, and I must admit I don’t often open the mail until I am sitting comfortably at my desk with a glass of cognac. That is also how I sometimes read your query letters, and given that it puts me in a much less stressful mood after a busy day you should be glad that I do. But a letter from an attorney’s office is something I thought should be opened right away. Are we being sued? No, the letter was something much more mundane, but I though it warranted comment.

The letter was from the Executor for the estate of a man who had recently passed away. In the assortment of items that the estate needed to “find a home for” was a manuscript. The letter was asking me if I would be interested in publishing the manuscript. I can’t fault the attorney for his inquiry – by law the manuscript is an asset of the estate, and as Executor he has a fiduciary responsibility to try and get as much for the assets of the estate as possible, even if the asset was created on an old typewriter. But after thinking about it I realized that a small publisher bringing this book to market would not make sense, either for the Executor or the publisher.

In the case of the Executor, he wants an advance that will most likely cover, if not exceed, the expected royalties for the book. Again I can’t fault the Executor  for this – he probably does not want to spend the next five to seven years cashing royalty checks, and again has an obligation to obtain as much for the asset as possible. But there are two problems with approaching a small publisher. First, most small publishers won’t give the Executor the type of advance he is looking for. Second, it’s not a good business decision for the small publisher. As I’ve said before, people do not buy book because they say Divertir Publishing on the title page. They buy books because of who the author is or because the book was recommended to them. Thus, at a time when over a million books – either from traditional presses, small presses, or self-published books – come out each year, an author who is not actively engaged with their readers and potential readers will probably not be discovered by new readers. An author who is not present at all, for whatever reason, will probably not be successful.

So for now Divertir Publishing will not be looking for manuscripts to publish at estate auctions – at least not until the Zombie Apocalypse, at which point we may need to rethink this business decision…

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1 Comment

Filed under Publishing

One response to “From the Dead…

  1. so, $100 question – was the manuscript any good?

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